Health-Healing Psychological-Sexual Driving Power of Thought

Driving Power of Thought

Driving Power of Thought
Catalog # SKU3697
Publisher TGS Publishing
Weight 1.00 lbs
Author Name Warren Hilton
ISBN 10: 0000000000
ISBN 13: 0000000000000
 
$7.95
Quantity

Description

Driving Power
of Thought


Applications of Psychology
to the Problems of Personal
and Business Efficiency

By
Warren Hilton


One of the greatest discoveries of modern times is the impellent energy of thought.

Larger Print, 14 point font

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Excerpt:

A Causal Judgment interprets and explains sense-perceptions. For instance, the tiny baby's first vague notion that something, no knowing what, must have caused the impressions of warmth and whiteness and roundness and smoothness that accompany the arrival of its milk-bottle-this is a causal judgment. Elementary Conclusions

The very first conclusion that you form concerning any sensation that reaches you is that something produced it, though you may not be very clear as to just what that something is. The conclusions of the infant mind, for example, along this line must be decidedly vague and indefinite, probably going no further than to determine that the cause is either inside or outside of the body. Even then its judgment may be far from sure.

First Effort of the Mind

Yet, baby or grown-up, young or old, the first effort of every human mind upon the receipt and perception of a sensation is to find out what produced it. The conclusion as to what did produce any particular sensation is plainly enough a judgment, and since it is a judgment determining the cause of the sensation, it may well be termed a causal judgment.

Causal judgments, taken by themselves, are necessarily very indefinite. They do not go much beyond deciding that each individual sensation has a cause, and is not the result of chance on the one hand nor of spontaneous brain excitement on the other. Taken by themselves, causal judgments are disconnected and all but meaningless.

Distorted Eye Pictures

I look out of my window at the red-roofed stone schoolhouse across the way, and, so far as the eye-picture alone is concerned, all that I get is an impression of a flat, irregularly shaped figure, part white and part red. The image has but two dimensions, length and breadth, being totally lacking in depth or perspective. It is a flat, distorted, irregular outline of two of the four sides of the building. It is not at all like the big solid masonry structure in which a thousand children are at work. My causal judgments trace this eye-picture to its source, but they do not add the details of distance, perspective, form and size, that distinguish the reality from an architect's front elevation. These causal judgments of visual perceptions must be associated and compared with others before a real "idea" of the schoolhouse can come to me.




86 pages - 5½ x 8½ softcover


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