Historical Reprints Science On Laboratory Arts

On Laboratory Arts

On Laboratory Arts
Catalog # SKU1665
Publisher TGS Publishing
Weight 1.00 lbs
Author Name Richard Threlfall
 
$15.95
Quantity

Description

On Laboratory Arts

by
Richard Threlfall

A Republished How-To book as part of a collection for urban survival by TGS Publishing. This is not just a general theory book for it includes many experiments and diagrams for practical applications. EXPERIMENTAL work in physical science rests ultimately upon the mechanical arts.

Excerpt:

It is true that in a well-appointed laboratory, where apparatus is collected together in greater or less profusion, the appeal is often very indirect, and to a student carrying out a set experiment with apparatus provided to his hand, the temptation to ignore the mechanical basis of his work is often irresistible.

It often happens that young physicists are to be found whose mathematical attainments are adequate, whose observational powers are perfectly trained, and whose general capacity is unquestioned, but who are quite unable to design or construct the simplest apparatus with due regard to the facility with which it ought to be constructed. That ultimate knowledge of materials and of processes which by long experience becomes intuitive in the mind of a great inventor of course cannot be acquired from books or from any set course of instruction.

There are, however, many steps between absolute ignorance and consummate knowledge of the mechanical arts, and it is the object of the following pages to assist the young physicist in making his first steps towards acquiring a working knowledge of "laboratory arts." However humble the ambition may be, no one can be more keenly alive than the writer to the inadequacy of his attempt; and it is only from a profound sense of the necessity which exists for some beginning to be made, that he has had the courage to air his views on matters about which there are probably hundreds or thousands of people whose knowledge is superior to his own.

Moreover, nothing has been further from the writer's mind than any idea of "instructing" any one; his desire is - if happily it may so befall - to be of assistance, especially to young physicists or inventors who wish to attain definite mechanical ends with the minimum expenditure of time.

Most people will agree that one condition essential to success in such an undertaking is brevity, and it is for this reason that alternative methods as a rule have not been given, which, of course, deprives the book of any pretence to being a "treatise." The writer, therefore, is responsible for exercising a certain amount of discretion in the selection he has made, and it is hardly to be hoped that he has in all - or even in the majority of cases - succeeded in recommending absolutely the best method of procedure.


CONTENTS.

PREFACE
CHAPTER I Hints On The Manipulation Of Glass And On Glass-Blowing For Laboratory Purposes
§ 4. Soft Soda Glass
§ 6. Flint Glass. -
§ 9. Hard or Bohemian, Glass. -
§ 10. On the Choice of Sizes of Glass Tube. -
§ 11. Testing Glass. -
§ 13. Cleaning Glass Tubes. -
§ 14. The Blow-pipe. -
§ 18. The Table.
§ 19. Special Operations. -
§ 20. Closing and blowing out the End of a Tube. -
§ 21. To make a Weld. -
§ 22. To weld two Tubes of different Sizes. -
§ 24. To weld Tubes of very small Bore. -
§ 30. To cut very thick Tubes. -
§ 31. To blow a Bulb at the End of a Tube. -
§ 32. To blow a bulb in the middle of a tube,
§ 33. To make a side Weld. -
§ 34. Inserted Joints. -
§ 35. Bending Tubes. -
§ 36. Spiral Tubes. -
§ 37. On Auxiliary Operations on Glass:-
§ 38. Boring small Holes. -
§ 39. For boring large holes through thick glass sheets,
§ 41. Operations depending on Grinding: Ground-in Joints. -
§ 42. Use of the Lathe in Glass-working. -
§ 46. Making Ground Glass. -
§ 47. Glass-cutting. -
§ 48. Cementing. -
§ 49. Fusing Electrodes into Glass. -
§ 51. The Art of making Air-light Joints. -
Appendix To Chapter I
CHAPTER II Glass-Grinding And Opticians' Work
§ 61. Details of the Process of Fine Grinding. -
§ 62. Polishing. -
§ 63. Centering. -
§ 64. Preparation of Small Lenses
§ 65. Preparing Small Mirrors for Galvanometers. -
§ 66. Preparation of Large Mirrors or Lenses for Telescopes. -
§ 69. The Preparation of Flat Surfaces of Rock Salt. -
§ 70. Casting Specula for Mirrors. -
§ 71. Grinding and polishing Specula. -
§ 72. Preparation of Flat Surfaces. -
§ 73. Polishing Flat Surfaces on Glass or on Speculum Metal. -
CHAPTER III Miscellaneous Processes
§ 74. Coating Glass with Aluminium and Soldering Aluminium. -
§ 75. The Use of the Diamond-cutting Wheel. -
§ 76. Arming a Wheel. -
§ 77. Cutting a Section. -
§ 78. Grinding Rock Sections, or Thin Slips of any Hard Material.-
§ 79. Cutting Sections of Soft Substances. -
§ 80. On the Production of Quartz Threads.' -
§ 84. Drawing Quartz Threads. -
§ 86. Drawing Threads by the Catapult. -
§ 87. Drawing Threads by the Flame alone. -
§ 88. Properties of Threads. -
§ 90. On the Attachment of Quartz Fibres. -
§ 91. Other Modes of soldering Quartz. -
§ 92. Soldering. -
§ 94. Preparing a Soldering Bit. -
§ 95. Soft Soldering. -
§ 96. Soldering Tin Plate. -
§ 97. Soldering Zinc. -
§ 98. Soldering other Metals -
§ 99. Brazing. -
§ 100. Silver Soldering. -
§ 101. On the Construction of Electrical Apparatus - Insulators. -
§ 102. Sulphur. -
§ 103. Fused Quartz. -
§ 104. Glass. -
§ 105. Ebonite or Hard Rubber. -
§ 106. Mica. -
§ 107. Use of Mica in Condensers. -
§ 108. Micanite. -
§ 109. Celluloid. -
§ 110. Paper. -
§ 111. Paraffined Paper. -
§ 112. Paraffin -
§ 113. Vaseline, Vaseline Oil, and Kerosene Oil. -
§ 114. Imperfect Conductors. -
§ 116. Conductors. -
§ 117. Platinoid. -
§ 119. Platinum Silver. -
§ 120. Platinum Iridium. -
§ 121. Manganin. -
§ 122. Other Alloys. -
§ 123. Nickelin. -
§ 124. Patent Nickel. -
§ 125. Constantin. -
§ 126. Nickel Manganese Copper. -
CHAPTER IV Electroplating And Allied Arts
§ 127. Electroplating. -
§ 128. The Dipping Bath. -
§ 130. Scratch-brushing. -
§ 131. Burnishing. -
§ 132. Silver-plating. -
§ 133. Cold Silvering. -
§ 134. Gilding. -
§ 135. Preparing Surfaces for Gilding. -
§ 136. Gilding Solutions. -
§ 137. Plating with Copper. -
§ 138. Coppering Aluminium. -
§ 140. Alkaline Coppering Solution -
§ 141. Nickel-plating.-
§ 142. Miscellaneous Notes on Electroplating.
§ 143. Blacking Brass Surfaces. -
§ 144. Sieves. -
§ 145. Pottery making in the Laboratory. -
Appendix Platinising Glass

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