Historical Reprints History SUBJECTION OF WOMEN

SUBJECTION OF WOMEN

SUBJECTION OF WOMEN
Catalog # SKU0948
Publisher TGS Publishing
Weight 1.00 lbs
Author Name John Stuart Mill
 
$12.95
Quantity

Description

THE
SUBJECTION OF WOMEN


by JOHN STUART MILL


JOHN STUART MILL (1869)

The Subjection of Women is an essay by John Stuart Mill written 1869 stating in essence that the subordination of one sex to another is "now one of the chief hindrances to human improvement".

Mill asserts that women should be equal to men in terms of "personal freedom". Mill's view is basically the beginning of liberal feminism, as he argues that this equality will benefit not just the women themselves, but the whole of society and men too.

It is written in 4 chapters, which do not have titles.

Excerpt

The object of this Essay is to explain as clearly as I am able grounds of an opinion which I have held from the very earliest period when I had formed any opinions at all on social political matters, and which, instead of being weakened or modified, has been constantly growing stronger by the progress reflection and the experience of life. That the principle which regulates the existing social relations between the two sexes--the legal subordination of one sex to the other--is wrong itself, and now one of the chief hindrances to human improvement; and that it ought to be replaced by a principle of perfect equality, admitting no power or privilege on the one side, nor disability on the other.

The very words necessary to express the task I have undertaken, show how arduous it is. But it would be a mistake to suppose that the difficulty of the case must lie in the insufficiency or obscurity of the grounds of reason on which my convictions. The difficulty is that which exists in all cases in which there is a mass of feeling to be contended against. So long as opinion is strongly rooted in the feelings, it gains rather than loses instability by having a preponderating weight of argument against it.

For if it were accepted as a result of argument, the refutation of the argument might shake the solidity of the conviction; but when it rests solely on feeling, worse it fares in argumentative contest, the more persuaded adherents are that their feeling must have some deeper ground, which the arguments do not reach; and while the feeling remains, it is always throwing up fresh intrenchments of argument to repair any breach made in the old. And there are so many causes tending to make the feelings connected with this subject the most intense and most deeply-rooted of those which gather round and protect old institutions and custom, that we need not wonder to find them as yet less undermined and loosened than any of the rest by the progress the great modern spiritual and social transition; nor suppose that the barbarisms to which men cling longest must be less barbarisms than those which they earlier shake off.


Paperback, 5 x 8, 125+ pages

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