Historical Reprints Science Lenape Stone, The : The Indian and The Mammoth

Lenape Stone, The : The Indian and The Mammoth

Lenape Stone, The : The Indian and The Mammoth
Catalog # SKU1814
Publisher TGS Publishing
Weight 1.00 lbs
Author Name Mercer
ISBN 10: 0000000000
ISBN 13: 0000000000000
 
$10.95
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Description

The
Lenape Stone


The Indian and
The Mammoth

by
H. C. Mercer

In the late 1800s, a mysterious artifact of ancient America was uncovered and dubbed the "Lenape Stone." Many stories, true and false ones, circulated throughout America. -- This author did his own research and gives an objective analysis.

From the Preface

The constantly recurring question, "Who constructed these works?" has brought before the public a number of widely different theories, though the one which has been most generally accepted is that they originated with a people long since extinct or driven from the country, who had attained a culture status much in advance of that reached by the aborigines inhabiting the country at the time of its discovery by Europeans.

Excerpt

IN claiming an impartial examination of so extraordinary a carving as the "Lenape Stone" at the hands of archaeologists, the writer has had several difficulties to contend with.

First, The fact that, the carving is quite unique, it being the first aboriginal carving of the mammoth thus fat claimed to have been discovered in North America. Second, That no "scientific observer" was present at the discovery.

Third, That since its discovery the Stone has been several times cleaned, and that thereby many geological tests of its authenticity have been rendered impossible. Fourth, That within the last few years, and particularly in Philadelphia, serious frauds have been perpetrated upon lovers of Indian relics.

These considerations may well have been sufficient to prejudice the mind of a stranger against the alleged wonderful Indian relic, yet they should in no case suffice to prevent, on the part of the archaeologists, a thorough and impartial examination of all the evidence pertaining to its discovery.

In presenting this and other evidence, the writer has wished only to be impartial, and to be led by the facts as they have presented themselves, and for the examination of which his opportunities have been peculiarly favorable.

In his knowledge of the neighborhood and its people (his home), an acquaintance with all the persons concerned, and very frequent visits to the Hansell Farm, nothing has yet occurred to shake his faith in the unimpeachable evidence of an honest discovery. Yet should any fresh light be brought to bear upon the subject, however at variance with this opinion, it will be welcomed.

The appearance in America of a carving of the hairy mammoth, presumably the work of our aborigines, if not a surprise to students of archaeology, would certainly be no less interesting than the French discoveries of some twenty years ago; while the ready connection of the work with the Indian of comparatively recent times, the appearance of human figures in the carving, and of many symbols which seem related to highly important branches of archaeological study, would awaken a more general and enthusiastic interest in the Stone, than has been felt for any other prehistoric representation of the great elephant.

A disbelief in its authenticity would leave us with an interest, not inconsiderable, in the unknown person who, after months of careful Study and preparation, could have conceived and executed so remarkable a fraud.

CONTENTS

Illustrations
Preface.
Part I.
Part II.
Appendix.
Statement of Bernard Z. Hansell.
Statement of Mr. Henry D. Paxon.
Statement of Mr. Albert Paxon.
Statement of Mr. John S. Ash
Statement of Capt. J. S. Bailey.
To the Editor of the Bucks County "Intelligencer"
Letter from Mr. H. Carvill Lewis
Letter from Dr. F. W. Putnam
Wadsworth examination of the Lenape Stone
Iddings examination of the Lenape Stone
Letter from Dr. F. W. Putnam
Evidence of An Honest Discovery.
Objections of Archaeologists.
Treatment of the Sun In Indian Pictography.
Lightning In Indian Pictography.
Lines Cut By Steel and Flint Instruments.
Newly Discovered Indian Carvings
Opinion of Indians.
Indian Pipe-Forms.
Indian Picture-Writing.
Tradition of The Great Buffalo.
The Cherokees and Ci-Ioctaws Descendants


Softcover, 5¼" x 8¼", 100+ pages
Perfect-Bound - 12 point font - 20+ Illustrations

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