Ancient Mysteries Unexplained Great Flood And Other Myths And Legends Of The Old Testament, The

Great Flood And Other Myths And Legends Of The Old Testament, The

Great Flood And Other Myths And Legends Of The Old Testament, The
Catalog # SKU1723
Publisher InnerLight/Global
Weight 1.00 lbs
Author Name James George Frazer
 
$24.95
Quantity

Description

The Great Flood And Other
Myths And Legends
Of The Old Testament


Studies in Comparative
Religion, Legend & Law

by
Sir James George Frazer

Conspiracy Journal brings back to print the long needed research of James George Frazer. There is a massive amount of research and analysis in this 225 page reprint! This one should be in the library of every free-thinker and truth-seeker.

From the Publisher:

I do not consider myself a Biblical scholar.

I am not even what you would call a " true believer." I don't take what I read in the Bible at face value. I am not an atheist, but I don't go around preaching hellfire and brimstone either.

On the other hand, I have always been interested in Biblical history and the ancient world where the events described in both the Old and New Testament take place. I even remember going to a class on Bible stories when I was maybe ten years old. In my hazy recollection, it was not even a class given by the church my parents attended.

But the stories of the Bible always were intriguing to me. After all, they are supernatural- it's like reading an ancient edition of " Fate Magazine."

My main interests, as most readers of Inner Light Publications will immediately recognize, gravitate around the subject of UFOs. I have had three sightings, and can honestly testify that UFOs are as real as the day is long, though I admit that I don't know what they are or from whence they originate. I even edited a book, " Flying Saucers In The Holy Bible," which discusses the connection between UFOs and the Tower of Babel, as well as how the real " Star Wars" is taking place in the universe between the forces of good and evil-the negative forces being directed, some theorize, by the fallen angel Lucifer.

Some might consider the book you are now holding in your hands to be provocative. It is nevertheless " down to earth" and logical-and certainly well-documented. This book offers proof that the stories of a Great Flood are universal, and that the Tower of Babel really existed and was the scene where different languages sprang up and spread throughout the world in punishment for Man's arrogance. The subject matter is altogether fascinating and I think it will appeal to scholars, believers, nonbelievers and those generally interested in the truth about Biblical accounts.

Bless you all and may this book bring peace into your world.
-Timothy Beckley, Publisher

EXCERPT

ATTENTIVE readers of the Bible can hardly fail to remark a striking discrepancy between the two accounts of the creation of man recorded in the first and second chapters of Genesis. In the first chapter, we read how, on the fifth day of creation, God created the fishes and the birds, all the creatures that live in the water or in the air; and how on the sixth day he created all terrestrial animals, and last of all man, whom he fashioned in his own image, both male and female.


From this narrative we infer that man was the last to be created of all living beings on earth, and incidentally we gather that the distinction of the sexes, which is characteristic of humanity, is shared also by the divinity; though how the distinction can be reconciled with the unity of the Godhead is a point on which the writer vouchsafes us no information. Passing by this theological problem, as perhaps too deep for human comprehension, we turn to the simpler question of chronology and take note of the statements that God created the lower animals first and human beings afterwards, and that the human beings consisted of a man and a woman, produced to all appearance simultaneously, and each of them reflecting in equal measure the glory of their divine original. So far we read in the first chapter. But when we proceed to peruse the second chapter, it is somewhat disconcerting to come bolt on a totally different and, indeed, contradictory account of the same momentous transaction. For here we learn with surprise that God created man first, the lower animals next, and woman last of all, fashioning her as a mere afterthought out of a rib which he abstracted from man in his sleep. The order of merit in the two narratives is clearly reversed. In the first narrative the deity begins with fishes and works steadily up through birds and beasts to man and woman. In the second narrative he begins with man and works downwards through the lower animals to woman, who apparently marks the nadir of the divine workmanship. And in this second version nothing at all is said about man and woman being made in the image of God. We are simply told that " the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul."

Afterwards, to relieve the loneliness of man, who wandered without a living companion in the beautiful garden which had been created for him, God fashioned all the birds and beasts and brought them to man, apparently to amuse him and keep him company. Man looked at them and gave to them all their names; but still he was not content with these playmates, so at last, as if in despair, God created woman out of an insignificant portion of the masculine frame, and introduced her to man to be his wife.

The flagrant contradiction between the two accounts is explained very simply by the circumstance that they are derived from two different and originally independent documents which were afterwards combined into a single book by an editor, who pieced the two narratives together without always taking pains to soften or harmonize their discrepancies. The account of the creation in the first chapter is derived from what is called the Priestly Document, which was composed by priestly writers during or after the Babylonian captivity. The account of the creation of man and the animals in the second chapter is derived from what is called the Jehovistic Document, which was written several hundred years before the other, probably in the ninth or eighth century before our era. The difference between the religious standpoints of the two writers is manifest. The later or priestly writer conceives God in an abstract form as withdrawn from human sight, and creating all things by a simple fiat. The earlier or Jehovistic writer conceives God in a very concrete form as acting and speaking like a man, modeling a human being out of clay, planting a garden, walking in it at the cool of the day, calling to the man and woman to come out from among the trees behind which they had hidden themselves, and making coats of skin to replace the too scanty garments of fig-leaves with which our abashed first parents sought to conceal their nakedness.

The charming naivety, almost the gaiety, of I the earlier narrative contrasts with the high seriousness of the later; though we cannot but be struck by a vein of sadness and pessimism running under the brightly coloured picture of life in the age of innocence, which the great Jehovistic artist has painted for us. Above all, he hardly attempts to hide his deep contempt for woman. The lateness of her creation, and the irregular and undignified manner of it-made out of a piece of her lord and master, after all the lower animals had been created in a regular and decent manner-sufficiently mark the low opinion he held of her nature; and in the sequel his misogynism, as we may fairly call it, takes a still darker tinge, when he ascribes all the misfortunes and sorrows of the human race to the credulous folly and unbridled appetite of its first mother.

Of the two narratives, the earlier or Jehovistic is not only the more picturesque but also the richer in folk-lore, retaining many features redolent of primitive simplicity which have been carefully effaced by the later writer, the two. Accordingly, it offers more points of comparison with the childlike stories by which men in many ages and countries have sought to explain the great mystery of the beginning of life on earth. Some of these simple tales I will adduce in the following pages.

CONTENTS

CHAPTER I
THE CREATION OF MAN
Two different accounts of the creation of man in Genesis
The Priestly and the Jehovistic narratives
The Jehovistic the more primitive
Babylonian and Egyptian parallels
Greek legend of the creation of man out of clay
Australian and Maori stories of the creation of man out of clay
Tahitian tradition : creation of woman out of man's rib
Similar stories of the creation of woman in Polynesia
Similar Karen and Tartar stories
Other stories of the creation of man in the Pacific
Melanesian legends of the creation of men out of clay
Stories of the creation of man in Celebes
Stories told by the Dyaks of Borneo
Legend told by the natives of Nias
Stories told by the natives of the Philippines
Indian legends of the creation of man
Cheremiss story of the creation of man
African stories of the creation of man
American stories of the creation of man
Our first parents moulded out of red clay
Belief of savages in the evolution of man out of lower animals
American Indian stories of the evolution of men out of animals
African and Malagasy stories of the evolution of men
Evolution of men out of fish in Africa and Borneo
Descent of men from trees and animals in the Indian Archipelago
Descent of men from animals in New Guinea
Descent of men from fish and grubs in the Pacific
Evolution of men out of animals in Australia
Evolutionary hypothesis of Empedocles
Creation or evolution?

CHAPTER II
THE FALL OF MAN
* I. The Narrative in Genesis
The temptation and the fall, the woman and the serpent
The two trees
The Tree of Life and the Tree of Death
The Creator's good intention frustrated by the serpent
The serpent's selfish motive for deceiving the woman
Widespread belief in the immortality of serpents
Story of the Fall, a story of the origin of death
* 2. The Story of the Perverted Message
Hottentot story of the Moon and the hare
Bushman story of the Moon and the hare
Nandi story of the Moon and the dog
Hottentot story of the Moon, the insect, and the hare
Bushman story of the Moon, the tortoise, and the hare
Louyi story of the Sun and Moon, the chameleon and the hare
Ekoi story of God, the frog, and the duck
Gold Coast story of God, the sheep, and the goat
Ashantee story of God, the sheep, and the goat
Akamba story of God, the chameleon, and the thrush
Togoland story of God, the dog, and the frog
Calabar story of God, the dog, and the sheep
Bantu story of God, the chameleon, and the lizard
The miscarriage of the message of immortality
* 3. The Story of the Cast Skin
Supposed immortality of animals that cast their skins
How men missed immortality and serpents, etc., obtained it
Belief that men formerly cast their skins and lived for ever
Belief that men used to rise from the dead after three days
How men missed immortality and the Moon obtained it
Bahnar story how men used to rise from the dead
Rivalry between men and serpents, etc., for immortality
* 4. The Composite Story of the Perverted Message and the Cast Skin
Galla story of God, the blue bird, and the serpent
Stories of the Good Spirit, men, and serpents
* 5. Conclusion
Original form of the story of the Fall of Man

CHAPTER III
THE MARK OF CAIN
The theory that the mark was a tribal badge
Homicides shunned as infected
Attic law concerning homicides
Seclusion of murderers in Dobu
Belief in the infectiousness of homicides in Africa
Earth supposed to spurn the homicide
Wanderings of the matricide Alcmaeon
Earth offended by bloodshed and appeased by sacrifice
The homicide's mark perhaps a danger-signal to others
The mark perhaps a protection against the victim's ghost
Ceremonies to appease the ghosts of the slain
Seclusion of murderer through fear of his victim's ghost
Fear of ghosts of the murdered, a motive for executing murderers
Protection of executioners against the ghosts of their victims
Bodily marks to protect people against ghosts of the slain
Need of guarding warriors against the ghosts of the slain
Various modes of guarding warriors against the ghosts of the slain
Faces or bodies of manslayers painted in diverse colours
The mark of Cain perhaps a disguise against the ghost of Abel
Advantage of thus interpreting the mark
The blood rather than the ghost of Abel prominent in the narrative
Fear of leaving blood of man or beast uncovered
Superstition a crutch of morality

CHAPTER IV
THE GREAT FLOOD
* 1. Introduction
Huxley on the Great Flood
The present essay a study in folk-lore
Bearing of flood stories on problems of origin and diffusion
* 2. The Babylonian Story of a Great Flood
Babylonian tradition recorded by Berosus
Nicolaus of Damascus on the flood
Modern discovery of the original Babylonian story
The Gilgamesh epic
Journey of Gilgamesh to Ut-napishtim
Ut-napishtim's story of the Great Flood
The building of the ship-the embarkation-the storm
The sending forth of the dove and the raven-the landing
Other fragmentary versions of the Babylonian story
Sumerian version of the flood story
The flood story borrowed by the Semites from the Sumerians
The scene of the story laid at Shurippak on the Euphrates
* 3. The Hebrew Story of a Great Flood
The story in Genesis
The story compounded of two different narratives
The Priestly Document and the Jehovistic Document
Late date and ecclesiastical character of the Priestly Document
Its contrast with the Jehovistic Document
Verbal differences between the Priestly and the Jehovistic Documents
Material differences between the documents in the flood story
The Jehovistic document the older of the two
Dependence of the Hebrew on the Babylonian story of the flood
Fanciful additions made to the flood story in later times
* 4. Ancient Greek Stories of a Great Flood
Deucalion and Pyrrha
The grounding of the ark on Parnassus
Aristotle and Plato on Deucalion's flood
Ovid's rhetorical account of the flood
Athenian legend of Deucalion's flood
The grave of Deucalion and the Water-bearing Festival at Athens
Story of Deucalion's flood at Hierapolis on the Euphrates
Water festival and prayers at Hierapolis
Deucalion, the ark, and the dove
Phrygian story of a flood associated with King Nannacus
Noah's flood on coins of Apamea Cibotos in Phrygia
Greek traditions of three great floods. The flood of Ogyges
Dates assigned by ancient authorities to the flood of Ogyges
The flood of Ogyges and the vicissitudes of the Copaic Lake
The ruins of Gla on a stranded island of the lake
The flood of Dardanus. Home of Dardanus at Pheneus
Alternations of the valley of Pheneus between wet and dry
The water-mark on the mountains of Pheneus
Samothracian story of great flood consequent on opening of Dardanelles
The Samothracian story partially confirmed by geology
The Samothracian story probably a speculation of an early philosopher
Story of Deucalion's flood perhaps an inference from the configuration of Thessaly
The Vale of Tempe
The Greek flood stories probably myths of observation
* 5. Other European Stories of a Great Flood
Icelandic story of a deluge of blood
Welsh story of a flood
Lithuanian story of a great flood
Flood story told by the gipsies of Transylvania
Vogul story of a great flood
Relics of the flood in Savoy
* 6. Supposed Persian Stories of a Great Flood
Supposed traces of a flood story in ancient Persian literature
The sage Yima and his blissful enclosure
* 7. Ancient Indian Stories of a Great Flood
The story in the Satapatha Brahmana. Manu and the fish
The story in the Mahabharata
The story in the Sanscrit Purànas
* 8. Modern Indian Stories of a Great Flood
Stories told by the Bhils and Kamars of Central India
Stories told by the Hos and Mundas of Bengal
Stories told by the Santals of Bengal
Stories told by the Lepchas of Sikhim and tribes of Assam
Shan story of a great flood
Tradition concerning the Vale of Cashmeer
Geological confirmation of the tradition
The tradition probably a myth of observation
* 9. Stories of a Great Flood in Eastern Asia
Stories told by the Karens and Singphos of Burma
Story told by the Bahnars or Bannavs of Cochin China
Stories told by the aborigines of the Malay Peninsula
Story told by the Lolos of Southern China
Chinese tradition of a great flood
A Chinese emperor on Noah's flood
Kamchadale story of a great flood
Mongolian story of a great flood
* 10. Stories of a Great Flood in the Indian Archipelago
Stories told by the Battas of Sumatra
Stories told by the natives of Nias and Engano
Stories told by the Dyaks of Borneo
Stories told by the natives of Celebes
Stories told by the natives of Ceram and Rotti
Story told by the natives of Flores
Stories told by the Philippine Islanders
Stories told by the wild tribes of Formosa
Story told by the Andaman Islanders
* 11. Stories of a Great Flood in Australia
Story told by the Kurnai of Victoria
Stories told by other tribes of Victoria
Stories told by the aborigines of South Australia and Queensland
* 12. Stories of a Great Flood in New Guinea and Melanesia
Stories told by the natives of New Guinea
R. Neuhauss on stories of a flood in New Guinea
Fijian story of a great flood
Melanesian story of a great flood
* 13. Stories of a Great Flood in Polynesia and Micronesia
Wide diffusion of such stories in the Pacific
Tahitian legends of a great flood
Hawaiian legends of a great flood
Mangaian story of a great flood
Samoan traditions of a great flood
Maori stories of a great flood
Story of a great flood told by the Pelew Islanders
* 14. Stories of a Great Flood in South America
Stories told by the Indians near Rio de Janeiro
Story told by the Caingangs of Southern Brazil
Story told by the Carayas of Brazil
Story told by the Ipurina of the Purus River
Story told by other Indians of the Purus River
Story told by the Jibaros of the Upper Amazon
Story told by the Muratos of Ecuador
Story told by the Araucanians of Chili
Story told by the Ackawois of British Guiana
Story told by the Arawaks of British Guiana
Story told by the Macusis of British Guiana
Stories told by the Indians of the Orinoco
Stories told by the Muyscas or Chibchas of Bogota
Geological evidence as to the valley of Bogota
Story told by the Canaris of Ecuador
Stories told by the Peruvian Indians
Story told by the Chiriguanos of Bolivia
Story told by the Fuegians
* 15. Stories of a Great Flood in Central America and Mexico
Stories told by the Indians of Panama and Nicaragua
Mexican tradition of a great flood
Michoacan legend of a great flood
Story of a great flood in the Popol Vuh
Story told by the Huichol Indians of Mexico
Stories told by the Cora Indians of Mexico
Story told by the Tarahumares of Mexico
Story told by the Caribs of the Antilles
* 16. Stories of a Great Flood in North America
Story told by the Papagos of Arizona
Stories told by the Pimas
Story told by the Zuñ i Indians of New Mexico
Stories told by the Californian Indians
Story told by the Natchez of the Lower Mississippi
Story told by the Mandan Indians
Annual Mandan ceremonies commemorative of the flood
Story told by the Cherokee Indians
Story of a Great Flood widely spread among the Algonquin
Story told by the Montagnais Indians of Canada
Story told by the Crees
The Algonquin story told in full by the Chippeways
An Ojibway version of the same story
Another Ojibway version of the same story
Another Ojibway version of the same story
Another version of the same story told by the Blackfoot Indians
Another version of the same story told by the Ottawas
Another version of the same story told by the Crees
Another version of the same story told by the Dogrib and Slave Indians
Another version of the same story told by the Hareskin Indians
Stories of a Great Flood told by the Tinneh Indians
Stories told by the Tlingit Indians of Alaska
Story told by the Haida Indians of Queen Charlotte Islands
Story told by the Tsimshian Indians of British Columbia
Story told by the Bella Coola Indians of British Columbia
Story told by the Kwakiutl Indians of British Columbia
Story told by the Lillooet Indians of British Columbia
Story told by the Thompson Indians of British Columbia
Story told by the Kootenay Indians of British Columbia
Stories told by the Indians of Washington State
Story told by the Indians of the Lower Columbia River
Stories told by the Eskimo and Greenlanders
* 17. Stories of a Great Flood in Africa
General absence of flood stories in Africa
Reported traces of such stories
Stories of a Great Flood reported in East Africa
* 18. The Geographical Diffusion of Flood Stories
Absence of flood stories in a great part of Asia
Rarity of flood stories in Europe
Absence of flood stories in Africa
Presence of flood stories in the Indian Archipelago, New Guinea, Australia, Melanesia,
Polynesia, and America
The Hebrew flood story derived from the Babylonian
Most other flood stories apparently independent of the Babylonian
Greek flood stories not borrowed from the Babylonian
Ancient Indian story probably independent of the Babylonian
Wide diffusion of the Algonquin story in North America
Evidence of diffusion in South America and Polynesia
Story told by the Anals of Assam
Story told of the pyramid of Cholula in Mexico
Story told by the Toltecs of Mexico
Karen and Mikir versions of the Tower of Babel
Admiralty Islands' version of the Tower of Babel
Stories as to the origin of the diversity of tongues in Greece, Africa, Assam, Australia,
and America
* 19. The Origin of Stories of a Great Flood
Old theory of a universal deluge supported by evidence of fossils
Survivals of the theory of a universal deluge in the nineteenth century
Stories of a Great Flood interpreted as solar, lunar, or stellar myths
Evidence of geology against a universal deluge
Philosophical theories of a universal primeval ocean
Many flood stories probably reminiscences of real events
Memorable floods in Holland
Floods caused by earthquake waves in the Pacific
Some flood stories in the Pacific probably reminiscences of earthquake waves
Inundations caused by heavy rains
Babylonian story explained by annual inundation of the Euphrates valley
Suess's theory of a flood caused by an earthquake and a typhoon
Objections to the theory
Diluvial traditions partly legendary, partly mythical
Myths of observation based on geological configuration and fossils
All flood stories probably comparatively recent

CHAPTER V
THE TOWER OF BABEL
The Tower of Babel and the confusion of tongues
Later Jewish legends as to the Tower of Babel
The Tower of Babel probably a reminiscence of a temple-tower
Two such ruined temple-towers at Babylon
The mound of Babil, formerly a temple of Marduk
Inscriptions of Nabopolassar and Nebuchadnezzar at Babil
The mound of Birs-Nimrud, formerly a temple of Nebo
Inscription of Nebuchadnezzar at Birs-Nimrud
Ruined temple-tower at Ur of the Chaldees
Inscription of Nabonidus at Ur
The temple-tower at Ur perhaps seen by Abraham
Theories as to the primitive language of mankind
Experimental attempts to determine the primitive language
African stories like that of the Tower of Babel
Story told by the Anals of Assam
Story told of the pyramid of Cholula in Mexico
Story told by the Toltecs of Mexico
Karen and Mikir versions of the Tower of Babel
Admiralty Islands' version of the Tower of Babel
Stories as to the origin of the diversity of tongues in Greece, Africa, Assam, Australia, and America


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