Historical Reprints Science Young's Scientific Secrets

Young's Scientific Secrets

Young's Scientific Secrets
Catalog # SKU0852
Publisher TGS Publishing
Weight 1.00 lbs
Author Name Daniel Young
 
$13.95
Quantity

Description

Young's Scientific Secrets
Demonstrative Translation of Scientific Secrets
or

A Collection of Above 500 Useful Receipts
on a Variety of Subjects.

by Daniel Young

Young's Scientific Secrets
author:Daniel Young

1st Published 1861

The object of the present work is clearly announced in its title. It is to collect within a small compass the instructions of experimental knowledge upon a great variety of subjects which relate to the present interests of man. It contains above five hundred genuine and practical receipts, which have been compiled by the publisher with extreme difficulty and expense.

Excerpt:

167. TO MAKE MOULDS OF HORN

If you wish to take the impression of any coin, medal, &c., previously anoint it with oil, then lay the horn shavings over it in its softened state; when dry the impression will be sunk into the horn, and this will serve as a mould to reproduce, either by plaster of Paris, putty and glue, or isinglass and ground egg shells, the exact resemblance of the coin or medal.

168. TO CASE FIGURES IN IMITATION OF IVORY

Make isinglass and strong brandy into a paste, with powder of egg shells, very finely ground; you may give it what colour you please, but cast it warm into your mould, which you previously oil over; leave the figure in the mould till dry, and you will find, on taking it out, that it bears a very strong resemblance to ivory.

169. TRUE GOLD POWDER

Put some gold leaf, with a little honey or thick gum water, (whenever I speak of gum I mean gum arabic,) into an earthen mortar, and pound the mixture till the gold is reduced to very small particles; then wash out the honey or gum repeatedly with warm water, and the gold will be left behind in a state of powder, which, when dried, is fit for use.

170. TRUE GOLD POWDER

Another, and perhaps better method of preparing gold powder is to heat a prepared amalgam of gold in a clean open crucible, (an amalgam of any metal is formed by a mixture of quicksilver with that metal) continuing a very strong heat till all the mercury has evaporated, stirring the amalgam all the while with a glass rod; when the mercury has entirely left the gold, grind the remainder in a Wedgewood's mortar, with a little water, and when dried it will be fit for use. The subliming the mercury is, however, a process injurious to the health.

End Excerpt


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