Historical Reprints Fiction Second Deluge, The

Second Deluge, The

Second Deluge, The
Catalog # SKU1727
Publisher TGS Publishing
Weight 1.00 lbs
Author Name Garrett P. Serviss
 
$15.95
Quantity

Description

The
Second Deluge

by
Garrett P. Serviss

A science fiction apocalyptic classic by Garrett P. Serviss. The end of New York City, and the civilized world by a great flood is the concern of the author and with today's global warming predictions, could it be -- once again -- a science fiction novel becomes a prophecy fulfilled? Could another flood, another Noah, another Ark be in mankind's future, as it was in his ancient past?

From the Preface

What is here set down is the fruit of long and careful research among disjointed records left by survivors of the terrible events described. The writer wishes frankly to say that, in some instances, he has followed the course which all historians are compelled to take by using his imagination to round out the picture. But he is able conscientiously to declare that in the substance of his narrative, as well as in every detail which is specifically described, he has followed faithfully the accounts of eyewitnesses, or of those who were in a position to know the truth of what they related.

EXCERPT

While Cosmo Versal was calculating, from the meas-ured rise of the water, the rate of condensation of the nebula, and finding that it added twenty-nine trillion two hundred and ninety billion tons to the weight of the earth every minute-a computation that seemed to give him great mental satisfaction-the metropolis of the world, whose nucleus was the island of Manhattan, and every other town and city on the globe that lay near the ordinary level of the sea, was swiftly sinking beneath the swelling flood.

Everywhere, over all the broad surface of the planet, a wail of despair arose from the perishing millions, beaten down by the water that poured from the unpitying sky. Even on the highlands the situation was little better than in the valleys. The hills seemed to have been turned into the crests of cataracts from which torrents of water rushed down on all sides, stripping the soil from the rocks, and sending the stones and bowlders roaring and leaping into the lowlands and the gorges. Farmhouses, barns, villas, trees, animals, human beings-all were swept away together.

Only on broad elevated plateaus, where higher points rose above the general level, were a few of the inhabitants able to find a kind of refuge. By seeking these high places, and sheltering themselves as best they could among immovable rocks, they succeeded, at least, in delaying their fate. Notwithstanding the fact that the atmosphere was filled with falling water, they could yet breathe, if they kept the rain from striking directly in their faces. It was owing to this circumstance, and to some extraordinary occurrences which we shall have to relate, that the fate of the human race was not precisely that which Cosmo Versal had predicted.

We quitted the scene in New York when the shadow of night had just fallen, and turned the gloom of the watery atmosphere into impenetrable darkness. The events of that dreadful night we shall not attempt to depict. When the hours of daylight returned, and the sun should have brightened over the doomed city, only a faint, phosphorescent luminosity filled the sky. It was just sufficient to render objects dimly visible. If the enclosing nebula had remained in a cloud-like state it would have cut off all light, but having condensed into raindrops, which streamed down in parallel lines, except when sudden blasts of wind swept them into a confused mass, the sunlight was able to penetrate through the interstices, aided by the transparency of the water, and so a slight but variable illumination was produced.

In this unearthly light many tall structures of the metropolis, which had as yet escaped the effects of under-mining by the rushing torrents in the streets, towered dimly toward the sky, shedding streams of water from every cornice. Most of the buildings of only six or eight stories had already been submerged, with the exception of those that stood on the high grounds in the upper part of the island, and about Spuyten Duyvil.

In the towers and upper stories of the lofty buildings still standing in the heart of the city, crowds of unfortunates assembled, gazing with horror at the spectacles around them, and wringing their hands in helpless de-spair. When the light brightened they could see below them the angry water, creeping every instant closer to their places of refuge, beaten into foam by the terrible downpour, and sometimes, moved by a mysterious impulse, rising in sweeping waves which threatened to carry everything before them.

Every few minutes one of the great structures would sway, crack, crumble, and go down into the seething flood, the cries of the lost souls being swallowed up in the thunder of the fall. And when this occurred within sight of neighboring towers yet intact, men and women could be seen, some with children in their arms, madly throwing themselves from windows and ledges, seeking quick death now that hope was no more!

Strange and terrible scenes were enacted in the neighborhood of what had been the water-fronts. Most of the vessels moored there had been virtually wrecked by the earlier invasion of the sea. Some had been driven upon the shore, others had careened and been swamped at their wharves. But a few had succeeded in cutting loose in time to get fairly afloat. Some tried to go out to sea, but were wrecked by running against obstacles, or by being swept over the Jersey flats. Some met their end by crash-ing into the submerged pedestal of the Statue of Liberty. Others steered up the course of the Hudson River, but that had become a narrow sea, filled with floating and tossing debris of every sort, and all landmarks being in-visible, the luckless navigators lost their way, and perished, either through collisions with other vessels, or by driving upon a rocky shore.

The fate of the gigantic building containing the offices of the municipal government, which stood near the an-cient City Hall, and which had been the culminating achievement of the famous epoch of "sky-scrapers," was a thing so singular, and at the same time dramatic, that in a narrative dealing with less extraordinary events than we are obliged to record it would appear altogether incredible.

CONTENTS

FOREWORD
CHAPTER I COSMO VERSAL
CHAPTER II MOCKING AT FATE
CHAPTER III THE FIRST DROPS OF THE DELUGE
CHAPTER IV THE WORLD SWEPT WITH TERROR
CHAPTER V THE THIRD SIGN
CHAPTER VI SELECTING THE FLOWER OF MANKIND
CHAPTER VII THE WATERS BEGIN TO RISE
CHAPTER VIII STORMING THE ARK
CHAPTER IX THE COMPANY OF THE REPRIEVED
CHAPTER X THE LAST DAY OF NEW YORK
CHAPTER XI "A BILLION FOR A SHARE"
CHAPTER XII THE SUBMERGENCE OF THE OLD WORLD
CHAPTER XIII STRANGE FREAKS OF THE NEBULA
CHAPTER XIV THE ESCAPE OF THE PRESIDENT
CHAPTER XV PROFESSOR PLUDDER'S DEVICE
CHAPTER XVI MUTINY IN THE ARK
CHAPTER XVII THE JULES VERNE
CHAPTER XVIII NAVIGATING OVER DROWNED EUROPE
CHAPTER XIX TO PARIS UNDER THE SEA
CHAPTER XX THE ADVENTURES IN COLORADO
CHAPTER XXI "THE FATHER OF HORROR"
CHAPTER XXII THE TERRIBLE NUCLEUS ARRIVES
CHAPTER XXIII ROBBING THE CROWN OF THE WORLD
CHAPTER XXIV THE FRENCHMAN'S NEW SCHEME
CHAPTER XXV NEW YORK IN HER OCEAN TOMB
CHAPTER XXVI NEW AMERICA


Softcover, 5¼" x 8¾", 305+ pages
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