Historical Reprints History Omaha, The : First Americans : Their Life, Medicine, Crafts, Skills, Myths and Religion

Omaha, The : First Americans : Their Life, Medicine, Crafts, Skills, Myths and Religion

Omaha, The : First Americans : Their Life, Medicine, Crafts, Skills, Myths and Religion
Catalog # SKU1819
Publisher TGS Publishing
Weight 1.00 lbs
Author Name Fletcher Dorsey
ISBN 10: 0000000000
ISBN 13: 0000000000000
 
$13.95
Quantity

Description

The Omaha
First Americans


Their Life, Medicine, Crafts,
Skills, Myths & Religion

by
James Owen Dorsey
Alice C. Fletcher

This compilation of research by these two authors presents the 'white man's' view of the Omaha Native Americans... and these authors add their awe and respect for this great people. The Omaha were quite an industrious organization before the Republican Radical Rumps destroyed their livelihood and lifestyle during the occupation years - aka Reconstruction.

The accompanying paper is one of the results of personal investigations among the Omaha of Nebraska and cognate tribes of Indians, beginning in 1878 and continued from time to time during late years.

While the paper treats of the Omaha tribe, much that is said is applicable to the Ponka, as the two tribes have long had similar environments and a common dialect, for, until 1877, their habitats were almost contiguous, and since 1880 about one-third of the Ponka tribe has been dwelling on its former reservation near the town of Niobrara, Nebraska.

Excerpt

When earth lodges were built, the people did not make them in a tribal circle, each man erecting his lodge where he wished; yet kindred commonly built near one another.

The earth lodges were made by the women, and were intended principally for summer use, when the people were not migrating or going on the hunt. Those built by the Omaha and Ponka were constructed in the following manner: The roof was supported by two series of vertical posts, forked at the top for the reception of the transverse connecting pieces of each series. The number in each series varied according to the size of the lodge; for a small lodge only four posts were erected in the inner series, for an ordinary lodge eight were required, and ten generally constituted the maximum.

When Mr. Say visited the Kansa Indians, he occupied a lodge in which twelve of these posts placed in a circle formed the outer series, and eight longer ones constituted the inner series, also describing a circle.

The wall was formed by setting upright slabs of wood back of the outer posts all around the circumference of the lodge. These slabs were not over 6 feet in height, and their tops met the cross timbers on which the willow posts rested. Stocks of hard willow about 2 inches in diameter rested with their butts on the tops of the upright slabs and extended on the cross timbers nearly to the summit. These poles were very numerous, touching one another and extending all around in a radiating manner, supporting the roof like rafters. The rafters were covered with grass about a foot thick; and over the whole lodge, including the sides or slabs, earth was piled from a foot to 2 feet in depth. Such a covering lasted generally about twenty years. A hole in the middle served as an exit for the smoke.

In addition to the lodge proper there was a covered way about 10 feet long and 5 feet wide, the entrance to which had a covering of tanned or dried buffalo hides. This covering consisted of two hides hanging side by side, with the inner borders slightly overlapping. They were fastened to the passageway at the top and at the outer sides, but were loose at the bottom where they overlapped. This part was raised by a person entering the lodge. A similar covering was placed at the interior end of the passageway.

CONTENTS

Omaha Dwellings, Furniture, and Implements
Collection of Historic Omaha Photos
Omaha Clothing and Personal Ornaments
The Sacred Pole of the Omaha Tribe.
On The Gentile System of the Omahas
The Omaha Buffalo Medicine-Men.
The Religion of the Omahas.
Hae-Thu-Ska Society of the Omaha Tribe
Omaha Myths
Child-Life Among the Omaha Tribe of Indians


Softcover, 5¼" x 8¼", 195+ pages
Perfect-Bound - 12 point font - 50+Illustrations

: *
: *
: *
Type the characters you see in the picture:


*
Wheel of Fortune
Man-Midwife's Mysteries
Mummy, The
 
Life of Joan of Arc (France)
Joan of Arc: The Maid (Twain)
Freemason's Manual 1862 Edition