Ancient Mysteries Earth's Labrynths Hollow Earth Arctic

Hollow Earth Arctic

Hollow Earth Arctic
Catalog # SKU2613
Publisher TGS Publishing
Weight 1.00 lbs
Author Name Dean Dominic DeLucia


Hollow Earth Arctic

Dean Dominic DeLucia

A short, but complete examination of the possible entrances to the Hollow Earth, being located at the North and South pole regions.



The Arctic body of evidence has been very important to the development of the modern Hollow Earth Theory. In fact, the observations of the Polar explorers of yesteryear brought new life to ancient folklore to this effect, folklore of the Tibetan, Hindu and the Nordic civilizations. For example, Marshall B. Gardner, in A Journey to the Earth's Center, cites Lord Barrington in his communication with the Royal Society thusly "Barrington recalled to the Royal Society that as early as 1663 its secretary at that time had examined a traveler lately returned from Greenland, and that this traveler had told of a Hollander captain who claimed that he had come within half a degree of the Pole, and corroborated it by showing his journal, the entries being attested by his mate.

Now, in view of later explorations, it does not matter just how accurate the sailor was- the point is simply that even in those early days it was possible to get much nearer the Pole than was supposed at the time, and simply for the reason that the water was open as one went north. But Barrington had instance after instance of the same kind. He mentions in particular two Hollander whalers who - in the 17th century- sailed to 89 degrees and found no ice but ' a free and open sea.'" In 1754, one Mr. Stephens, on board a Dutch whaler noted that he "did not find the cold excessive, and used little more than common clothing, and met with but little ice."

Arctic anomalies such as these inspired the notion that openings to a warmer world lay somewhere within the Arctic region. As early as 1818, former Captain John Cleves Symmes of Ohio was actively promulgating the idea that the Earth was hollow, and the Norwood Review of England, in its issue of May 10, 1884, reported: "We do not admit that there is ice up to the Pole - once inside the great ice barrier, a new world breaks upon the explorer, the climate is mild like that of England, and afterwards, balmy like that of the Greek isles."

Printed in a large 12 point font for ease of reading

115+ pages - 8¼ X 6¾ softcover

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